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American Framing - The Same Something for Everyone

Author/EditorAndersen, Paul (Author)
Kelley, Jayne (Author)
Preissner, Paul (Author)
Robbennolt, Linda (Author)
Shea, Daniel (Author)
Publisher: Park Books
ISBN: 9783038601951
Pub Date08/11/2021
BindingPaperback
Pages136
Dimensions (mm)11(h) * 8(w)
A visual and textual exploration of softwood timber-framed construction in the United States since 1832, highlighting also how this quintessentially American type of construction has come to dominate the USA's built landscape and erased typological and social distinctions in a socially and economically deeply divided country.
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Originating in 1832 in Chicago with a balloon-framed warehouse designed by George Washington Snow, timber framing - also known at the time as 'Chicago construction' - introduced softwood construction to the world. The easy availability of the principal material, its simplicity of construction, an ability to be erected by low or unskilled workers, and the growing economies and populations of the American Midwest proliferated an architecture that has since dominated the American built landscape and erased typological and class distinctions of architectural production. The richest and poorest people live in houses that are built the same way: all framing is the same and all framing is good.

American Framing: The Architecture of a Specific Anonymity is a visual and textual exploration of the conditions and consequences of these ubiquitous structures. Archival drawings and images from origin, along with newly commissioned photographs by Linda Robbennolt, Daniel Shea, and Chris Strong, as well as and plans and drawings show this quintessentially American type of construction that has enabled an all-American architecture.

Originating in 1832 in Chicago with a balloon-framed warehouse designed by George Washington Snow, timber framing - also known at the time as 'Chicago construction' - introduced softwood construction to the world. The easy availability of the principal material, its simplicity of construction, an ability to be erected by low or unskilled workers, and the growing economies and populations of the American Midwest proliferated an architecture that has since dominated the American built landscape and erased typological and class distinctions of architectural production. The richest and poorest people live in houses that are built the same way: all framing is the same and all framing is good.

American Framing: The Architecture of a Specific Anonymity is a visual and textual exploration of the conditions and consequences of these ubiquitous structures. Archival drawings and images from origin, along with newly commissioned photographs by Linda Robbennolt, Daniel Shea, and Chris Strong, as well as and plans and drawings show this quintessentially American type of construction that has enabled an all-American architecture.

Paul Andersen is the director of Independent Architecture, a Denver-based office with projects that speculate on the roles that form, repetition, and pop culture play in architecture. Jayne Kelley is an editor and writer based in Chicago and currently a visiting assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago's School of Architecture. Paul Preissner is the principal of Paul Preissner Architects in Oak Park, IL, and an Associate Professor of Architecture at University of Illinois at Chicago.

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