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New Industrial Urbanism: Designing Places for Production

Author/EditorHatuka, Tali (Author)
Ben-Joseph, Eran (Author)
ISBN: 9780367427719
Pub Date24/03/2022
BindingPaperback
Pages270
Dimensions (mm)280(h) * 210(w)
New Industrial Urbanism explores the evolving and future relationships between cities and places of production, focusing on the spatial implications and physical design of integrating contemporary manufacturing into the city.
$40.42
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Since the Industrial Revolution, cities and industry have grown together; towns and metropolitan regions have evolved around factories and expanding industries. New Industrial Urbanism explores the evolving and future relationships between cities and places of production, focusing on the spatial implications and physical design of integrating contemporary manufacturing into the city. The book examines recent developments that have led to dramatic shifts in the manufacturing sector - from large-scale mass production methods to small-scale distributed systems; from polluting and consumptive production methods to a cleaner and more sustainable process; from broad demand for unskilled labor to a growing need for a more educated and specialized workforce - to show how cities see new investment and increased employment opportunities. Looking ahead to the quest to make cities more competitive and resilient, New Industrial Urbanism provides lessons from cases around the world and suggests adopting New Industrial Urbanism as an action framework that reconnects what has been separated: people, places, and production. Moving the conversation beyond the reflexively-negative characterizations of industry, more than two centuries after the start of the Industrial Revolution, this book calls to re-consider the ways in which industry creates places, sustains jobs, and supports environmental sustainability in our cities.

Since the Industrial Revolution, cities and industry have grown together; towns and metropolitan regions have evolved around factories and expanding industries. New Industrial Urbanism explores the evolving and future relationships between cities and places of production, focusing on the spatial implications and physical design of integrating contemporary manufacturing into the city. The book examines recent developments that have led to dramatic shifts in the manufacturing sector - from large-scale mass production methods to small-scale distributed systems; from polluting and consumptive production methods to a cleaner and more sustainable process; from broad demand for unskilled labor to a growing need for a more educated and specialized workforce - to show how cities see new investment and increased employment opportunities. Looking ahead to the quest to make cities more competitive and resilient, New Industrial Urbanism provides lessons from cases around the world and suggests adopting New Industrial Urbanism as an action framework that reconnects what has been separated: people, places, and production. Moving the conversation beyond the reflexively-negative characterizations of industry, more than two centuries after the start of the Industrial Revolution, this book calls to re-consider the ways in which industry creates places, sustains jobs, and supports environmental sustainability in our cities.

Tali Hatuka, an architect and urban planner, is a Professor of Urban Planning and the head of the Laboratory of Contemporary Urban Design, at Tel Aviv University (lcud.tau.ac.il). Her work is focused primarily on two fields: urban society, and city design and development. Hatuka is the author and co-author of the books: The Design of Protest, Violent Acts and Urban Space in Contemporary Tel Aviv, The Factory, State-Neighborhood, The Planners, City-Industry and Land-Gardens. She also works as a city planner and urban designer advising municipalities and the public sector. Hatuka has received many awards, including a Fulbright Scholarship and a Marie Curie Scholarship at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). She holds degrees from the Technion in Israel and Heriot-Watt University in the UK. Eran Ben-Joseph is the Class of 1922 Professor of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning and the former head of the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His research and teaching areas include urban and physical design, standards and regulations, sustainable site planning technologies and urban retrofitting. He authored and co-authored the books: Streets and the Shaping of Towns and Cities, Regulating Place: Standards and the Shaping of Urban America, The Code of the City, RENEW Town and ReThinking a Lot. Ben-Joseph worked as a city planner, urban designer, and landscape architect in Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and the United States. He holds academic degrees from the University of California at Berkeley and Chiba National University of Japan.

PART I FOR PRODUCTION'S SAKE 1. People, Factories, and Making 2. Between Production and City Development 3. The Way Forward: New Industrial Urbanism PART II PLACES OF MAKING 4. Clustering New Industries 5. Reinventing Industrial Areas 6. Forming Hybrid Districts 7. Industry and Place PART III OPEN MANUFACTURING 8. Advancing Regions 9. Integrating Urban-Industrial Systems 10. Working, Living, and Innovating 11. New Industrial Urbanism

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