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Redesigning Pedagogies in Innovative Learning Spaces

Author/EditorBlackmore J (Author)
Dixon, Mary (Author)
Cloonan, Anne (Author)
Loughlin, Jill (Author)
O'Mara, Joanne (Author)
ISBN: 9781138022430
Pub Date31/12/2023
BindingPaperback
Pages
Dimensions (mm)234(h) * 156(w)
389,00 kr
excluding shipping
Availability: Available to order but not yet published
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Governments have invested significantly in recent times in designing buildings for the future based on the notion that new ways of teaching and learning are required for the modern learner. Such designs have been well informed by contemporary educational and architectural theory and embed learning technologies. Technology and flexible learning spaces have been uncritically linked to innovative teaching and improved student learning outcomes but there has been little empirical research that actually tells us what happens in redesigned learning spaces. This text presents critical examples of the effects of redesign in twelve schools. They illustrate how flexibility, connectivity and temporality interact pedagogically and the conditions that are conducive to innovative practices and their sustainability.
Building on the detailed case studies the book: * illustrates the complexity of teaching and learning and shows how systems can support schools * interrogates assumptions about what constitutes innovation, leadership, collaborative learning, and learning outcomes with regard to spatiality and connectivity * also, because the sample of schools is across high and low socio economic locations, as well as primary, secondary and community based schools, the study has much to say about social-spatial inequality. In addition, while the data derives from conventional case study approaches the research team also developed specific new visual methodological tools to facilitate student voice. In particular, the methodologies indicated significant potential for enabling students and teachers to become co-producers of knowledge about how they teach and learn, while researching their own practices as a form of educational inquiry. The text concludes with consideration of the implications of redesign for policy and practice, arguing that flexible learning spaces, as learning technologies, can, but do not necessarily, enable pedagogical reform.
Furthermore, the authors argue that the focus has to be first and foremost on innovative pedagogies informed by collaborative teaching within these spaces, as a necessary condition under which practice may improve student learning.

Governments have invested significantly in recent times in designing buildings for the future based on the notion that new ways of teaching and learning are required for the modern learner. Such designs have been well informed by contemporary educational and architectural theory and embed learning technologies. Technology and flexible learning spaces have been uncritically linked to innovative teaching and improved student learning outcomes but there has been little empirical research that actually tells us what happens in redesigned learning spaces. This text presents critical examples of the effects of redesign in twelve schools. They illustrate how flexibility, connectivity and temporality interact pedagogically and the conditions that are conducive to innovative practices and their sustainability.
Building on the detailed case studies the book: * illustrates the complexity of teaching and learning and shows how systems can support schools * interrogates assumptions about what constitutes innovation, leadership, collaborative learning, and learning outcomes with regard to spatiality and connectivity * also, because the sample of schools is across high and low socio economic locations, as well as primary, secondary and community based schools, the study has much to say about social-spatial inequality. In addition, while the data derives from conventional case study approaches the research team also developed specific new visual methodological tools to facilitate student voice. In particular, the methodologies indicated significant potential for enabling students and teachers to become co-producers of knowledge about how they teach and learn, while researching their own practices as a form of educational inquiry. The text concludes with consideration of the implications of redesign for policy and practice, arguing that flexible learning spaces, as learning technologies, can, but do not necessarily, enable pedagogical reform.
Furthermore, the authors argue that the focus has to be first and foremost on innovative pedagogies informed by collaborative teaching within these spaces, as a necessary condition under which practice may improve student learning.

Jill Blackmore Professor Jill Blackmore is Alfred Deakin Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Education, Deakin University; and Director of the Centre for Research in Educational Futures and Innovation. Her research interests include globalisation, education policy and governance across all sectors of education - universities, TAFE, schools and community; educational leadership and reform; local/global articulations of internationalisation; organisational change and innovation; teachers' and academics' work; and the changing relations between education and the individual, community, family and the state.Her recent work has focused on redesigning schools and leadership, focusing on issues of spatiality, networking and inequality. Relevant Australian Research Council projects are:-Leadership in the entrepreneurial University: Disengagement and diversity; Redesigning Schools and Leadership; and Inter-agency collaboration supporting resilient students, families and schools in disadvantaged communities. Publications include Performing and Re-forming Leaders: gender, educational restructuring and organisational change (with Judyth Sachs 2007, SUNY); Repositioning the university: Changing governance and academic work (co-editors Brennan. M and Zipin, L., Sense Publishers, 2010), and forthcoming Feminists theorising social justice in educational administration and leadership forthcoming, Routledge). She is co-editor (with P. Thomson and H. Gunter) of a new Routledge book series Critical Theories and Educational Leadership. Blackmore is past president of the Australian Association of Research in Education and currently Managing Editor of the Australian Educational Researcher and on the Editorial Boards of six international journals. Deb Bateman Dr Debra Bateman is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Deakin University. She is interested in the ways that space affords and challenges the ways that learning and teaching occur. Dr Bateman is an educational futurist, examining change within policy, with a specific focus on curriculum. She has successfully completed a number of funded research grants, and has publications across the areas of futuresand technologies. Dr Bateman has won a number of Australian awards for her outstanding contribution to teaching and learning. Anne Cloonan After working as a primary school teacher and with the Department of Education and Early Childhood Education Victoria, Dr Cloonan is a Senior Lecturer at Deakin University in language and literacy education. Her research addresses teacher and student learning as they intersect with emerging technologies and language and literacy education. In this area of increasing centrality, her work explores the complexities of literacy education in transition shaped and the opportunities and limitations of new technologies. Anne works with teachers for deep and coordinated teaching and learning of multimodal texts and multimodal literacies and transformed views of what it means to be literate. Mary Dixon Associate Professor Dixon is Associate Head of School Research in the School of Education, Faculty of Arts and Education, Deakin University. Her research interests include pedagogy, identity curriculum, learning in space and place, teacher education, methodology and visual research methods. Current research projects include a Study on the Effectiveness Teacher Education (Australian Research Council Linkage with DEECD, QBS); Moments in Time: Australian History Curriculum (Australian Research Council Linkage with DEECD, HTAV, VCAA). Dixon has published across her fields of interest. She has worked as a researcher for several years in Singapore, Thailand and Nepal. She is associate editor of the Australian Educational Researcher. Jill Loughlin Dr Jill Loughlin is a Lecturer in Curriculum and Pedagogy. She has 15 years experience as a primary and junior secondary teacher in both general and specialist classrooms.

1. Framing up the Study: Redesign as process and product 2. Tangled Environments 3. Methodological Matters 4. Student Voice 5. Professional Learning Communities 6. Sustainability of Redesign

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