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Tbilisi: Architectural Guide

Author/EditorWheeler, Angela (Author)
Publisher: DOM Publishers
ISBN: 9783869226286
Pub Date01/11/2018
BindingPaperback
Pages376
Dimensions (mm)245(h) * 134(w)
This guide presents over 120 buildings and projects in the Georgian capital. It serves not only as a helpful guide for tourists but also as a documentation of the city's social history. The selection of buildings covers a broad spectrum of sights that are not only aesthetically interesting but also shed light on the city's historical developments.
€46.92
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Availability: 50 In Stock
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Tbilisi, capital of the Republic of Georgia, has attracted increasing international attention in recent years. Buildings play no small part in its reputation, as evidenced by the urban megaprojects enacted by successive administrations, countless real estate adverts shilling surrealist investment properties, and the recent establishment of the Tbilisi Architecture Biennial.

Architecture offers perhaps the best guide to the myriad contradictions of the city‘s history: Tbilisi is a Silk Road outpost with caravanserais newer than brownstone Brooklyn. The Orientalist landmarks that prompted many a traveller to invoke the ‘Thousand and One Nights’ were, in fact, usually built by members of a German minority emulating European trends. Today, touts may peddle tours of Brutalist Soviet ruins, but one would be hard-pressed to find clear examples of the style within city limits.

This book helps to unravel the different layers of this fascinating metropolis. It provides in-depth profiles of more than 120 buildings, themed guides to many others (sacred architecture, Art Nouveau, Constructivism), and essays contributed by local scholars.

Tbilisi, capital of the Republic of Georgia, has attracted increasing international attention in recent years. Buildings play no small part in its reputation, as evidenced by the urban megaprojects enacted by successive administrations, countless real estate adverts shilling surrealist investment properties, and the recent establishment of the Tbilisi Architecture Biennial.

Architecture offers perhaps the best guide to the myriad contradictions of the city‘s history: Tbilisi is a Silk Road outpost with caravanserais newer than brownstone Brooklyn. The Orientalist landmarks that prompted many a traveller to invoke the ‘Thousand and One Nights’ were, in fact, usually built by members of a German minority emulating European trends. Today, touts may peddle tours of Brutalist Soviet ruins, but one would be hard-pressed to find clear examples of the style within city limits.

This book helps to unravel the different layers of this fascinating metropolis. It provides in-depth profiles of more than 120 buildings, themed guides to many others (sacred architecture, Art Nouveau, Constructivism), and essays contributed by local scholars.

Angela Wheeler is an architectural and urban historian. Based in Massachusetts, she has worked in and researched the heritage industrial complex since 2010. Angela is currently a PhD candidate in the history of architecture and urbanism at Harvard University's Graduate School of Design, and teaches at Amherst College and the University of Massachusetts. Her recent work examines the Soviet Union's historic preservation movement.

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